Ringing Rocks Park

Scientists have looked for reasons and admit they are stumped. Several explanations have been offered including strange electromagnetic activity, background radiation, and abnormal magnetic fields but nothing has been conclusively proven as to why the rocks in Upper Black Eddy, Pennsylvania make a ringing sound when struck with a hammer. That’s right, it’s called the Ringing Rocks Park and it has attracted geologists, bikers, picnickers and tourists alike for its abundance of these chiming rocks. Locals have gone as suggesting the supernatural or even aliens to be involved with the ringing of the rocks.

In 1890, one of the leading geologists of the time collected a few rocks of different pitches from the park and used them as an instrument at a local band. Now that, the locals would claim, was a ‘rock’ concert. All the rocks are made of the same material, mainly iron and aluminum, the same stuff that accounts for most of the earth’s crust. However, only one rock in three makes the live, or makes the ringing sound; the other two are dead. It’s easy to spot the best of the live ones; they’ve been whitened and dimpled by all the hammer blows they’ve been taking over the centuries.

On your average weekend, this park resembles a hardworking blacksmith’s shop as kids and adults pound the rocks and fill the air with sounds of hammer on stone. As mysterious as they are, Upper Black Eddy is not the only place in the world where these rocks are found; they exist on different locations across the globe including in the UK, Australia and Mexico. After all the speculation linking the rocks to aliens and the supernatural, it seems more likely an enormous flood or glacial activity caused the rocks to end up where they are. Nevertheless, the rocks retain their sense of mystery because we don’t know exactly why they chime.


Ringing Rocks Park